View Single Post
Old 03-14-2011, 08:00 PM   #13
Mike the Metal Ed
Blue & White Pure Delight
 
Mike the Metal Ed's Avatar
 
Posts: 11,948
Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)Mike the Metal Ed puts the "bang" in Bangladesh (30,000+)
The only true "big" promotion left is LDN wrestling, as British wrestling hasn't been mainstream since the 1970s. All Star Wrestling tour nationally, but mostly as a seaside attraction, with some American "stars" imported to draw the crowds. The FWA was a big promotion at one point, fueled by Jody Fleisch and national exposure on the now-defunct Wrestling Channel but it folded and is now in the process of rebuilding. While not a British promotion, some British talent (notably Drew Galloway/McIntyre) have made a name for themselves in Irish Whip Wrestling, One Pro Wrestling draw (or at least drew at some point) decent crowds by packing the card with TNA/RoH talent but they only operate in Doncaster, and I'm not sure how financially healthy they are.

The rest is made up of various regional schools and promotions that tend to run in school gyms or working mens' clubs in front of little more than 100 people.

The production values of British wrestling shows is next to nothing, and most of the wrestlers are amateur or semi-pro, as well as a ripped body not being as crucial as it is Stateside so the look of the promotion is hard to sell to a casual fan of WWE or TNA.

I should also point out that no promotion has a television or PPV deal, Brits prefer boxing.
Mike the Metal Ed is offline   Reply With Quote